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Monday, May 31, 2010

The Covered Bridge


                                                                
It was a beautiful Sunday in spring. Perfect for an afternoon drive. We live in a bustling city but just outside of town, the subdivisions morph into pastoral countryside. We turned down a little country road and were rewarded with the sight of a beautiful, century-old covered bridge sprawled across a serene-flowing river. After stopping to snap photos, we got back in the car and decided to cross the bridge to see where it led. Surprisingly, vehicles are still allowed to traverse the historic structure at a wicked 5 miles per hour. Rumbling over the clunky, wooden planks, we thought about the horse-drawn wagons that had bumped over this same route years ago. On the other side, we came upon the last vestiges of what was once a thriving saw mill town. A few old dilapidated, wood houses, a church and a weathered barn are all that remain. Over the decades, the acreage around the town has grown into a lush forest and the surrounding fields flaunt millions of midnight blue phlox...all bobbing their perky heads in the gentle breeze. Standing knee-deep in wild flowers, we gazed up at the sagging, decrepit barn and embraced the utter stillness and peaceful solitude of our surroundings.

In the blink of an eye, we were transported back one hundred years. It was all so unexpected to discover this lovely, hidden little place. It's quaint, quiet and basically undisturbed today. But I wonder what it must have been like a century or more ago. The buzz of the saw mill. The men...hot and sweltering, covered in saw dust performing a dirty, dangerous job. The women...outside washing clothes, tending their gardens, baking bread. The children...helping out with the chores. From sunup to sundown, no electricity out there in the sticks. No mammoth, modern-day grocery stores, no Home Depots or malls. No computers or fast food or cell phones or TV.

It was a back-breaking hard life back then. Yet the simplicity and beauty of that bucolic, little village today masks the difficulties and hardships those country folk faced.  Every so often, I wish I lived in a simpler time...with no worries of terrorists or identity theft or oil spills. But then I come to my senses and realize that I'd be lost without the microwave, computer and a million other technological conveniences.  Still I'm glad that sweet, little country village has not entirely disappeared. The rugged, old covered bridge was like a time tunnel that for just a brief spec of time, guided us to a peaceful oasis far removed from our crazy, hectic, modern society. Over a hundred years after the town's demise, it continues to provide an unpretentious beauty, grace and homespun charm that is often lacking in our world today. I think we'll be back for many more visits.
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15 comments:

Blissed-Out Grandma said...

What a lovely spot! It looks so peaceful. I can almost imagine the inhabitants coming back to visit! Thanks for sharing these photos.

RawknRobynsGoneBlogWild said...

This was lovely, BP. Thanks for taking me back.
Sorry it's been a while since I visited, but I'm glad I stopped by now.
Be well.
xoRobyn

Brenda Grolle said...

Wonderful pictures, thanks for sharing your experience.

Oklahoma Granny said...

Thank you for taking us along on your drive. What treasures you found - both the wonderful covered bridge and what was beyond.

Coffeypot said...

One of my fantisies that does not include several women is to go back in time and see life as it was. I could live back then, even without my Waffle House.

ReformingGeek said...

Nice! I feel like I'm in another dimension.

I enjoyed the photos.

Cheeseboy said...

We have no covered bridges in Utah. None. Nada. I missed the covered bridges when I lived in PA for awhile. Not that I ever saw one quite this beautiful.

Janet said...

Where is this mystery spot? Will you share it with your sistas?

Leanne said...

Such a lovely post and the photos are so charming. Thanks for sharing it with us! Just a lovely lovely post!

J.P. Travis said...

Cool. Old things are cool. (The older I get, the more I think that way.) Trouble is, there isn't much that's old in America except for the land itself. While you're enjoying a century-old bridge, over in Europe they have two thousand year old bridges built by the Romans... still in everyday use.

Jude said...

Hmm, my only knowledge of a covered bridge is in Ada? Is that it? Nice pics.

gayle said...

I have been on a bridge that looks very much like that one. Beautiful!

Judie said...

GREAT PHOTOGRAPHS! It has been so long since I have gone exploring outside Tucson. I really should get back to it, and thanks to your post, I think I will!

Marla said...

What a pretty place. Love the photos!

Kristin said...

So beautiful! Your photography is great.

I just want to be there. Not on a day like today, of course, when it was 101. Today, I'm happy for modern amenities like air conditioning.

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